Max Stirner

Max_stirnerBrief Biography:
Johann Kaspar Schmidt (October 25, 1806 – June 26, 1856), better known as Max Stirner, was a German philosopher. He is often seen as one of the forerunners of nihilism, existentialism, postmodernism, and anarchism, especially of individualist anarchism. Stirner’s main work is The Ego and Its Own, also known as The Ego and His Own (Der Einzige und sein Eigentum in German, which translates literally as The Unique One and His Property). This work was first published in 1845 in Leipzig, and has since appeared in numerous editions and translations

Bibliography:
“The False Principle of our Education” (1842). Author.
“Art and Religion” (1842). Author.
The Ego and Its Own (1844) Author.
Stirner’s Critics (1845) Author.
Famous Sayings of Max Stirner (Thurland and Thurland, 1896), Author.

Representative Quote:

I write because I wish to make for ideas, which are my ideas, a place in the world. If I could foresee that these ideas must take from you peace of mind and repose, if in these ideas that I sow I should see the germs of bloody wars and even the cause of the ruins of many generations, I would nevertheless continue to spread them. It is neither for the love of you nor even for the love of truth that I express what I think. No—I sing! I sing because I am a singer. If I use you in this way, it is because I have need of your ears!

-Max Stirner, The Ego and His Own