John Basil Barnhill (1864 – 1925)

BarnhillBorn April 24, 1864
Died January 21st, 1929
Writer, lecturer, debater, ed. of various journals including The Eagle and the Serpent (1898)  (under pseud. John Erwin McCall), Nationalist, American Anti-Socialist, and Humanity First.

Journals:
The Eagle and The Serpent (1898)
Nationalist (19–)
American Anti-Socialist (1912)
Humanity First (1919)

 

 


Below is copypasta until we can sort it out a little more:

“Humanity First is trying, in the spirit of John Ruskin, to remove the fundamental injustices which
breed class hatred. We hold that unless Privilege is curbed, red ruin will inevitably
overrun the world. We stand for the abolition of interest and all the privileges,
of which it is the direful spring, and it seems to us that thus and thus only can society evolve, in a peaceful and orderly manner, to its
next stage. Privilege and Humanity cannot co-exist.”


from http://www.chambersheritage.com/pafg481.htm

Laurance loved coffee, and occasionally talked about another coffee-lover, John Basil Barnhill, editor of a famous journal of the Tucker era, The Eagle and the Serpent. (Henry Meulen, the editor in London of The Individualist, probably the only organ in the world advocating monetary ideas close to those of the Proudhon-Tucker-Labadie sort, once told a story of losing touch with Barnhill after years of contact, and then getting a cryptic postcard from him, from a Detroit hospital, which simply said, “Dear Meulen: coffee is the devil. Yours Barnhill.”)


Classified fromThe Publisher’s Weekly for December 24th, 1921

Papers, 1891-1935.
John Basil Barnhill
Available at Special Collections Research Center Reading Room ((SPC) MSS SP 048)

Format
2.2 cubic ft. (3 boxes).
Description
Papers of this American political activist includes assorted pamphlets, periodicals, handbills, photographs, newspapers etc. (both pro and anti-socialist); items relating to Barnhill’s career, e.g. prospectuses, programs, booklists, cards; manuscript notes, handwritten speeches; and correspondence from industrialist Arthur Kitson, Hugo Bilgram, the Banking Reform League, and the LaFollette campaign. Also included is campaign material for Barnhill’s run for congress (Democrat) in the 24th Congressional District.
John Basil Barnhill, born in Xenia, Ill., in 1864, was a noted anti-socialist writer, editor, politician, and debater during the first quarter of the 20th century. He was primarily active in Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C., where he pursued his manifold activities. He published numerous articles, pamphlets and edited such periodicals as The American anti-socialist and Humanity first. Barnhill actively campaigned against socialism and debated Eugene V. Debs, Walter Thomas Mills, and other prominent socialists of the period. During the Presidential campaign of 1924 Barnhill aligned himself with Robert M. LaFollette and the Progressives.
Preliminary inventory.

From the description of John Barnhill papers, 1891-1925. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68796291

From the description of Papers, 1891-1925. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34366724

John Basil Barnhill, born in Xenia, Ill., in 1864, was a noted anti-socialist writer, editor, politician, and debater during the first quarter of the 20th century. He was primarily active in Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C., where he pursued his manifold activities. He published numerous articles, pamphlets and edited such periodicals as The American anti-socialist and Humanity first. Barnhill actively campaigned against socialism and debated Eugene V. Debs, Walter Thomas Mills, and other prominent socialists of the period. During the Presidential campaign of 1924 Barnhill aligned himself with Robert M. LaFollette and the Progressives.

http://www.worldcat.org/title/papers-1891-1935/oclc/727944365


Liberty Vol. 8, No. 43 — 225 — June 11, 1892
Liberty Vol. 8, No. 43 — 225 — June 11, 1892

 

Vol. 10, No. 12 — 298 — October 20, 1894
Liberty Vol. 10, No. 12 — 298 — October 20, 1894

 

Now Journal, May 1903
http://www.iapsop.com/archive/materials/now/now_v4_n2_may_1903.pdf

 

Clipped from The Canton Independent-Sentinel, 24 Jan 1929
Clipped from The Canton Independent-Sentinel, 24 Jan 1929